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Self-Help Restraining Orders

Restraining Orders

There are different types of restraining orders. You have to make sure you ask for the right one. For example, you would file one type if you need protection from your spouse or ex. You would file another type if you need one against your neighbor (whom you've never dated). If you file the wrong type, the judge won't be able to make a decision in your case and you'll have to start the process over.

Deciding what to file

This is general information about who can ask for the different types of restraining orders. Select the type of restraining order to find out more about what protection it offers and whether it's best for your situation.

Figure out which restraining order you need

Situation Types of restraining orders

You need protection from someone you had a relationship with (more than friends), like your spouse, an ex, or your child's other parent. Or you need protection from a close family member like your child, parent, grandparent, or sibling (not an aunt or uncle or cousin).

Domestic violence

You need protection from someone you never had a relationship with (never more than friends) and are not closely related to. For example, you need protection from a neighbor, aunt or uncle, or coworker. 

Civil harassment

Someone who is either 65 or older or a dependent adult needs protection from someone else (like a caretaker or adult child) who is abusing or neglecting them.

Elder abuse

Typically, a police officer or sheriff who thinks someone might hurt themselves or someone else with a gun. This can stop that person from buying or owning a gun. It can't order them to stay away from someone.

Gun violence

 An employer who needs to protect one of their employees. Workplace violence
 A representative of a private college who needs to protect one of their students. School violence

Get help if you're not sure

If you're not sure which one is right for your situation, talk to someone at your court's Self-Help Center. They can explain the differences.

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